INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT (ICC) – The Prosecutor v. Fefe War

UNDER SECRETARIES-GENERAL: Mehmet Natuk Köseoğlu, Gülce Kazaz
ACADEMIC ASSISTANT: Melis Pekmezci

International Criminal Court (ICC) establishment history spans over more than a century. The “road to Rome” was a long and often contentious one.  One of the close calls for an internationalized system of justice came from the drafters of the 1919 Treaty of Versailles and followed by historical events, namely the World War I and World War II Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals.

“Rome Conference” took place from 15 June to 17 July 1998 in Rome, Italy, with 160 countries participating in the negotiations and the NGO Coalition closely monitored these discussions, distributed information worldwide on developments, and facilitated the participation and parallel activities of more than 200 NGOs. At the end of five weeks of intense negotiations, 120 nations voted in favor of the adoption of the Rome Statute of the ICC, with seven nations voting against the treaty (including the United States, Israel, China, Iraq, and Qatar) and 21 states abstaining. The agreement entered into force on 1 July 2002.

In the light of the historical evolution of the ICC, in these year’s BILGI Model United Nations, judges of the ICC will be deciding on a fictional case regarding the international crimes defined in the Rome Statute.